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World Sin Moo Hapkido Association of Northern Virginia

SIN MOO HAPKIDO JUNG SHIN KWAN
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Saigō Tanomo (西郷頼母), May 16, 1830 - April 28, 1903) was a Japanese samurai of the late Edo period. Chief senior councilor (hittōgarō 筆頭家老) of the Aizu clan. The Saigô family held the post of karô to the Aizu-Matsudaira clan hereditarily, from generation to generation. In 1862, Lord Matsudaira Katamori was appointed the Kyoto Shugo Shoku (Military Commissioner of Kyoto). He achieved fame due to his distinguished action in the Boshin War. Surviving the war, he adopted the name Hoshina Chikanori (保科近野里) .

 

The Saigô family held the post of karô to the Aizu-Matsudaira clan hereditarily, from generation to generation. In 1862, Lord Matsudaira Katamori was appointed the Kyoto Shugo Shoku(Military Commissioner of Kyoto). Saigô Tanomo, who was karô at the time, protested that Lord Katamori should not accept the post, and was dismissed from his karô position in 1863. In 1868, he was allowed to return the position after the Battle of Toba-Fushimi. In April, he entreated Lord Katamori to surrender after being defeated at Shirakawaguchi. Finally he was expelled (escaped?) from Aizu-Wakamatsu castle with his son Kichijûrô and headed to Hakodate. In total, 21 of his family members committed suicide before the Imperial troops entered the city. Following surrender of Hakodate, he was confined until 1872. He worked as a Shintô priest in Nikkô Tôshô Gû for awhile. In 1903, he died in Wakamatsu city.